5 Mother’s Day Gifts That Keep On Giving

MONEY TALKS –

With Mother’s Day on the horizon, you may be scrambling around to find the perfect gift for mom. While none of the gifts below can be tucked in a card or fit into a box, they all will touch mom’s heart in one way or another. Following these simple steps will make mom proud and keep her happy for years to come.

1. Start Saving Early – Most of us have probably heard mom repeat the old adage that a penny saved is a penny earned. While saving pennies today won’t get you far (a Venti Latte at Starbucks will cost you four hundred and fifteen), saving dollar bills will. If you saved a dollar per day from the time you were 10 years old until you reach 16.5 years old, you could have almost $3,100*. While this won’t buy you a new BMW, it could go a long way towards purchasing that used Toyota Camry your neighbor is selling.

2. Finish Your Degree – On average, college graduates earn about a million dollars more over their lifetimes than high school graduates. In fact, the average salary for a 2016 college graduate has soared to over $50,000, while high school graduates are treading around $35,000. Higher earnings typically allow us to become financial independent earlier in life. Becoming independent will ease mom’s financial burden and allow her to focus on own needs such as a trip to the salon or a relaxing massage.

3. Pay Your Student Loans – If mom was nice enough to co-sign on your student loans, missing a payment or making a late payment could adversely affect her credit. This could prevent mom from qualifying for a home equity line to update the kitchen or from purchasing that condominium in Florida she’s been dreaming about for the last few years. Set up the auto pay function on your student loans to ensure your payments are always made in full and on time.

4. Do What You Love – Above all, mom wants to see you happy. Choosing a career in a field that interests and excites you will inherently lead to a happier and more rewarding life. Focusing your time and efforts on something you are truly good at will allow you to fully realize your unique abilities and add more value to the world.

5. Pay It Forward – As a young child it’s incomprehensible to understand how giving can be more rewarding that receiving. However; as we age and mature, the gratification from helping someone else far outweighs the rewards of receiving a tangible gift. Make mom proud by choosing a cause that you are passionate about and start giving back. There are lots of ways you can give back whether it be a simple monetary donation, giving physical goods, volunteering your time, sharing special skills, or by recruiting others to help.

I would be remiss if I didn’t mention that all mom’s love flowers. Stop by your local florist and pick up a flower bouquet or mixed floral arrangement. And don’t forget the card! Here’s to wishing all the moms out there a joyous mother’s day.

 

*Using an 8% interest rate, compounded monthly.

How Much Do I Need to Retire?

MONEY TALKS – Friends and family often ask me how much savings they need in order to retire. While I am more than happy to talk in generalities, I try to steer away from giving any specifics when I don’t have all the facts. Without a complete view of their financial picture, it would not only be impossible but irresponsible of me to answer their questions.

Unfortunately, more often than not, before I have a chance to respond, they hastily begin shouting out numbers. “Do I need ½ million? 1 million?” Typically this leads to me awkwardly trying to explain that the solution isn’t that simple and ethically I really shouldn’t answer their question. This response is usually met with a bewildered look and the inevitable “So you’re saying that’s not enough?” (Heavy sigh) At this point I coyly suggest that if they really want to know the answer they should become a client.

In an effort to provide friends and family with some guidance (and to quell the family banter), I have devised a quick back of the envelop calculation to give you a ballpark estimate of how much savings you need to retire. The calculation is rather easy to complete but does require some preliminary information before you can get started. I have included here a list of the necessary data as well as a simple worksheet that will walk you through this back of the envelope approach. Please bear in mind that this is a rudimentary calculation that won’t give you an exact figure, but it can be used as a reality check to see if you are on target to retire comfortably.

Here’s what you will need:

  • Pay statement
  • Federal and state tax returns
  • Social Security statement
  • Pension statement
  • Estimate of any other income you may receive in retirement.

In order to help illustrate the underlying methodology let’s consider the following scenario:

  • Tom (60) and Rachael (58) are married with four kids. Tom, an engineer by trade, is the primary wage earner with a gross salary of $150,000 per year. Rachael works as teacher earning $50,000 per year. Tom’s net take home pay is $3,750 and Rachel’s net take home pay is $1,250.
  • They both get paid twice per month, for a total of 24 times per year.
  • Last year they paid $18,400 in Federal taxes and $6,600 in state taxes.
  • Neither Tom nor Rachel are eligible for medical benefits through their employer after they retire. When eligible, they plan to go on Medicare and purchase a supplemental Medigap policy.
  • Tom is eligible for Social Security and expects his annual benefit at full retirement age to be about $43,000. Rachel earnings as a teacher do not qualify for Social Security benefits; however, through her teachers union, she is entitled to a pension benefit of $40,000 per year. Neither plan to seek part-time employment in retirement.
  • Tom and Racheal both plan to work until their mid-sixties. They live a healthy lifestyle and plan to live well into their nineties.

Now let’s work through the numbers:

retirement-chart

Based on the chart above, Tom and Rachel would need about $1.5 million in order to retire.

While I hope that you find the above exercise helpful, please keep in mind that is a static calculation which doesn’t take into account life changes that may occur in retirement. To get a more precise calculation or recommendation, I would encourage you to reach out to a qualified financial advisor.


*Multiplier is based on a success rate of 90% or more for a 15, 30, and 45 year portfolio. The calculations were completed by William P. Bengen, CFP® and can be found is his book Conserving Client Portfolios During Retirement.

** Note: the Savings Required field is not specific in nature and does not take into account your individual facts and circumstances. Accordingly, this should not be relied upon when determining how much money you need to retire, nor does it substitute for any legal, financial, tax, or accounting advice.

10 Habits of the Healthy, Wealthy, & Wise

MONEY TALKS

1. Save – Saving more than you spend is a key concept to accumulating wealth. The extra money saved can then be invested to grow and compound over the years. Given enough time, your investment earnings may one day actually exceed the money you are saving!

2. Build a Reserve – Establishing a cash reserve or long term savings account can give you the security you need in the event of an emergency. Having liquid funds available may allow you to weather the storm without having to deplete other investments that are subject to market conditions.

3. Organize Spending – Creating separate bank accounts for your personal spending, household bills, and long term savings can go a long way towards balancing your budget. Start by funding your household checking with enough money to pay your monthly bills. Next, create a dedicated savings account funded based on a percentage of your income, say five or ten percent. The remaining money should be deposited into your personal checking and can be used for whatever you desire.

4. Buy Used Things – No one thinks twice about buying a “used” home; however, when it comes to buying a car, furniture, or children’s toy, the concept suddenly becomes taboo. Before making your next large purchase consider what alternatives exist in the secondary market. You may walk away with a lot more than you think along with some extra change in your pocket.

5. Don’t Procrastinate – Not paying your bills on time can lead to late fees and interest penalties. Over time these can accumulate to the point where the majority of your payment is going towards interest and penalties rather than paying down principal. Avoid getting stuck in this rut by paying your bills on time and in full.

6. Ditch Bad Habits – Daily stops for coffee and weekday lunches out with your colleagues can accumulate into some serious spending over time. Drinking your employer provided coffee and bringing last night’s leftover dinner for lunch are easy alternatives to help curb those bad habits. Don’t be afraid of treating yourself to the occasional iced coffee or Friday lunch to celebrate your accomplishments.

7. Know Your Limits – Most investors lose money because they overestimate their risk tolerance. When the market goes down they panic, sell their holdings, and suffer catastrophic losses. Choosing a more conservative portfolio and staying the course will get you far ahead of the typical investor who changes direction based on current market conditions.

8. Eat Healthy – Small changes can make a big difference in your overall health. Drinking water instead of sugary drinks is a great way to cut calories and reduce your sugar intake. Adding color to your meal is an easy way to improve your plate appearance and get more essential vitamins, minerals, and fibers into your body. Choose red, orange, and dark green fruits and vegetables when preparing dishes.

9. Exercise – Heart disease has risen to become the leading cause of death in the United States. Regular exercise can help combat disease and prevent a wide range of health problems. Not to mention, exercise and physical activity can also help you to maintain weight loss, improve your mood, boost your energy, and promote better sleep.

10. Wear Your Seat Belt – Each year about 33,000 people are killed in motor vehicle crashes. Tragically many of these fatalities could have been prevented. Seat belt use is the most effective way to save lives and reduce injuries in motor vehicle crashes. Make sure that you and your passengers buckle up every time you get into a vehicle no matter how short the trip.

Tip of the Week – Keep College Savings in Your Name

Keep College Savings in Your Name

Parents often start a college savings account in their child’s name because it’s the intuitive thing to do. After all, it’s the child that will be attending college, not the parent. Unfortunately there can be adverse consequences to this arrangement particularly as it relates to financial aid. When applying for financial aid, 20% of the assets in the student’s name are taken into consideration, however only 5.6% of the parental assets are considered. This means that an account with $3,500 in the child’s name will reduce the students financial aid the by same amount as a parental account with $12,500 would. Take the time to properly title college savings assets under your name, it could result in your college bound child receiving a much larger financial aid award.